Am I at increased risk from COVID-19 infection?

Coronavirus can affect anyone. If you are an older adult and have a long-term health condition, COVID-19 can be very serious and in some cases fatal. You should have the COVID-19 vaccine if you are:

  • an adult living or working in a care home for the elderly
  • a frontline healthcare worker
  • a frontline social care worker
  • a carer working in domiciliary care looking after older adults
  • aged 65 years and over
  • younger adults with long-term clinical conditions (see next page)

The vaccine will also be offered to adults with conditions such as:

  • a blood cancer (such as leukaemia, lymphoma or myeloma)
  • Diabetes
  • Dementia
  • a heart problem
  • a chest complaint or breathing difficulties, including bronchitis, emphysema or severe asthma
  • a kidney disease
  • a liver disease
  • lowered immunity due to disease or treatment (such as HIV infection, steroid medication, chemotherapy or radiotherapy)
  • rheumatoid arthritis, lupus or psoriasis
  • liver disease
  • having had an organ transplant
  • having had a stroke or a transient ischaemic attack (TIA)
  • a neurological or muscle wasting condition
  • a severe or profound learning disability
  • a problem with your spleen, e.g sickle cell disease, or having had your spleen removed
  • are seriously overweight (BMI of 40 and above)
  • are severely mentally ill

All people who are in the Clinically Extremely Vulnerable group will be eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine. Whether you are offered the vaccine may depend on the severity of your condition. Your GP can advise on whether you are eligible.